Category: Projects

Press: Schitt’s Creek Season 5 Gets Premiere Date, Larger Episode Order

Schitt’s Creek fans, it’s time to brush up on your Tina Turner: The quirky comedy will be back for a fifth season on Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 10/9c, Pop TV announced Monday.

Season 5 will span 14 episodes, making it the series’ longest run yet. Read on for the official season description:

The Roses are finally thriving in Schitt’s Creek and find themselves ready to take their personal relationships and business pursuits to the next level. Moira returns from a breakthrough film shoot in Bosnia with a clear exit strategy and a renewed sense of purpose, and with that newfound energy, she is inspired to leave her mark on the town by launching her most ambitious artistic endeavor yet. Meanwhile, the reputation of the Rosebud Motel is steadily building under Johnny’s leadership, but managing the individual needs of his staff, Stevie and Roland, proves to be a greater challenge. With Rose Apothecary running smoothly, David is now focusing on nurturing his relationship with Patrick, and from apartment hunting to joining a baseball team, he proves he’s willing to go the extra mile. Alexis, having finally achieved some stability in both romance and career, isn’t one to let things get stale, so she tries to spice things up with Ted while contemplating a next step that could take her beyond Schitt’s Creek.

Pop also announced an airdate for the Schitt’s Christmas special, which technically serves as the Season 4 finale: Wednesday, Dec. 19, at 10/9c. The installment will find Johnny hoping to celebrate the holidays with an old-fashioned Rose family Christmas party, but getting everyone on board at the last minute will take serious effort.
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Press: Ask AnnieThing: “How Do You Know If You’re in Love?”

Welcome to ‘Schitt’s Creek’ actor Annie Murphy’s sex and relationship column, Ask AnnieThing, where you, YES YOU, can ask her your most pressing life questions. This month, she tackles the L word

I’m six months into my first serious relationship and my partner told me he loves me, but I’m having a hard time returning the sentiment because I’m not sure that I feel the same way. I think I love him, but I’m confused because “love” seems so unquantifiable—plus I don’t have any other relationships to compare it to. Movies make such a big deal about getting butterflies and saying the big “I love you” while making out in the rain, but I’m not sure if that’s there for me. I really care about him, we have a lot of respect for each other and I really enjoy being with him, but I don’t know if I’m “in love.” How do you know you’re in love, anyway?

I’d been dithering about how to delicately answer this question, when Ewan McGregor swung onto my shoulder like a handsome, grinning, tuxedoed, monkey and yelled a quote from his turn as Christian in Moulin Rouge: “Love is a many splendored thing! Love… LIFTS us up where we belong! All you need is love!” Then, in a normal tone, he added, “Just answer the fucking question.” I was like, “Good call, Ew.” (That’s what I call him.)

So here it is: I don’t think you’ve fallen in love with your boyfriend yet.

I think this because I’ve had the great fortune of being in the spinning bingo cage that is falling in love. And though “I feel like I’m in a spinning bingo cage of love” is (somehow) not yet a cliché, I can assure you that ACTUAL clichés about falling in love exist for very good reason.

When you fall in love, you DO feel like there are pre-historic butterflies that have made a home for themselves in your actual body. You DO think about the person 143,000 times a day, because now even weird things like Brita filters and gum remind you of them. You DO get “ma’am-ed” at the grocery story because you’re 1,000 miles away, daydreaming about what it was like making out with this person in the rain. Or devising elaborate plans to make it rain, so you can finally make out in it.

Granted, I am speaking from my own personal experience, but I know I’m not alone. Over thousands of years, people have built castles, written books and plays and songs and poems, they’ve painted paintings, jumped out of airplanes, dressed up like something super dumb for Halloween, broken the bank, burned bridges, eaten sea urchin, gone to war, and probably even driven for billions of hours across deserts full of lava and snakes, because they’re crazy in love. The world is full of incredible proof that people have fallen in love.

BUT.

ON THE OTHER HAND (and btw, there are way more than two hands here… we’re talking about love, mmkay?), I do very much believe that loving and falling in love can exist independently of one another. Love doesn’t always come in the form of dolphins leaping across the ocean’s horizon. Love can be found in companionship, love can develop over time and it can form out of necessity, proximity or familiarity. That’s one of love’s most wonderful characteristics—it comes in many shapes and sizes, and it can grow out of many things.

BUT.

ON THE OTHER, OTHER HAND (I told you this was going to be a thing), if, after a bunch of months into your first serious relationship, you haven’t felt at least a few little wings punching around in your stomach lining, then something might be missing. And if it is, that’s okay. Sometimes a whole bunch of people come and go before Rachael McAdams and Ryan Gosling yelling about being birds and smooching around in the ocean starts to make sense.

Though it’s possible you might not find the feeling you’re looking for in this relationship, I can promise you one thing: you’ll know when you’re the equivalent of Ewan McGregor in Moulin Rouge, swinging like a handsome, grinning, tuxedoed monkey, around a giant elephant-shaped outdoor lounge decorated like a Moroccan bazaar, while stars sparkle in the sky above.
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Press/Video: How Annie Murphy Learned To Advocate For Herself – And Found Success

The Schitt’s Creek star on how she learned to speak up for herself and the moment she found out she got her life-changing role.

You may recognize Annie Murphy as quick-witted former rich girl Alexis Rose on the hit TV comedy Schitt’s Creek. Here, the actor talks about how she learned to cope with rejection in the industry, and find her voice offscreen.

Did you always know you wanted to be an actor?
For a long time, I thought I was going to go into law, but theatre just kept being so present in my life. [But] being on stage and getting that [positive] feedback from the audience, it was a really incredible feeling that I didn’t really want to part with.

Why is it important to advocate for yourself?
When I started out in the industry, I felt the need to say “yes” to everything. You wanted to be an actor, so you took acting jobs. So your agent would call you up, and be like, “I’ve got an audition where you’re going to play a nude woman who transforms into a werewolf in the back of a truck!” And you’re like, “Yay, I can’t wait to do that audition in front of a stranger.” [That’s why] it’s very important to listen to your gut.

How did you learn to handle rejection?
There is so much heartbreak and letdown in this industry. You get your heart set on something, and then you’re sitting by the phone for three weeks and it never rings. I don‘t think that necessarily ever gets easier, but you learn that there’s going to be something else — that’s going to make you feel the same way — coming down the tracks. I don’t think the heartbreak ever gets that much easier to swallow. You just learn to look at it from a different perspective.

What advice do you have for some just starting out in this industry?

Really have the confidence that you have something awesome to bring to the table. Write and create as much as you can, because if you’re sitting around waiting for someone to give you a well-round, interesting, incredible role on a silver platter, you’re going to be a real cute skeleton covered in cobwebs when that happens.

What’s been the best moment of your career so far?
When I got the part on Schitt’s Creek! When I got the call, I just jumped around and giggled and laughed all over the place. That was my biggest, best moment so far.

How do you define success?
Success, I think, is a combination between a happy work [situation] and a happy life. As vague as that is, that’s what it means to me, at this point right now in my life.
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Press: The Best TV Shows of 2018 (So Far)

The year so far has been crammed with so much great television that even with many standbys absent from the scene — fan favorites including “Better Call Saul,” “Game of Thrones,” and “Veep” have not broadcast episodes in 2018 — a list of the year’s great TV feels comprehensive, even with half the year to go. This list of 13 television shows and one TV movie, a mix of new and returning broadcasts, is an attempt to name some of what stood out most sharply to Variety‘s critics: Those shows that, in an unprecedentedly crowded landscape, demanded our attention and earned our appreciation. The first half of the year has been strong enough to make the eventual task of winnowing down a year-end best list seem very difficult indeed; for now, here are some shows from the past six months worth catching up on.

Schitt’s Creek (Pop)
The Canadian comedy about a rich family stripped of everything began as a delightfully silly showcase for its cast, including Dan and Eugene Levy (who co-created the show), the ever-incredible Catherine O’Hara, and the surprisingly formidable Annie Murphy. But four seasons later, “Schitt’s Creek” has evolved right alongside its characters to become more confident and mature. Dan Levy, who also serves as writer and showrunner, finds a worthy partner onscreen in Noah Reid’s Patrick. Murphy more than holds her own as her spoiled Alexis lets herself open up. And the reliable team that is Eugene Levy and O’Hara build on decades of working together to make their married characters ring both true and deeply absurd. — CF
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Press/Video: Eugene And Daniel Levy On The Inclusivity And Love At The Heart Of ‘Schitt’s Creek’

(Annie is also in this interview.)

Four seasons ago, Pop TV comedy series Schitt’s Creek began with a compelling fish-out-of-water premise. Following the wealthy Rose family and their life of excess, the series really got cooking when they all went broke, resulting in them moving to a run-down town they once bought as a joke.

The Contenders Emmys 2018
While this conceit is essential to the series, for co-creator and star Daniel Levy, the show has always been about love. “It’s been about leaving them in this town to realize what is truly important. That was really the thrust of the show from the very beginning, and fortunately, you can tell so many stories about love,” he told TVLine’s Michael Ausiello last month during the comedy’s panel at Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys. “It presents itself in so many different iterations. That’s been what the joy has been for us, to continue to reveal that to these characters.”

Co-creator Eugene Levy, appearing on the panel with his son as well as co-stars Catherine O’Hara and Annie Murphy, discussed Schitt’s Creek as a place of inclusivity, emblematic of the series’ values.

“Now, the town itself is a community that deals with people for who they are, and not what they are. This is not a black, white or brown show; it’s not about gay or straight; it’s not about city/country; it’s not about male/female,” he said. “People are accepted for who they are, and that’s the good-feeling vibe about Schitt’s Creek.”

For more from the cast of the series—as they discuss Moira (O’Hara)’s wigs and a sibling relationship crafted seamlessly for the screen—click above.
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Press: ‘Schitt’s Creek’ Heads To Syndication Via Lionsgate’s Debmar-Mercury

Lionsgate’s Debmar-Mercury has acquired U.S. broadcast syndication rights to Schitt’s Creek, the single-camera comedy that is the top-rated original show on Pop, the cable network co-owned by Lionsgate and CBS.
The series, created by Eugene Levy and Daniel Levy, stars Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Chris Elliott, Daniel Levy, Annie Murphy and Emily Hampshire. It centers on a wealthy family who goes broke and moves to Schitt’s Creek, a small town they once bought as a joke. Season five of the series, renewed by CBC and Pop, is currently in production.
The show has grown steadily, albeit from a modest base. Its fourth season, which wrapped April 11, drew 116% more adults 18-49 than the average viewership in the first season. Total viewership has nearly doubled.
“It is not every day you can walk into a TV station with a comedy this good, with a cast this talented and be able to point to the kind of ratings growth, social buzz and critical acclaim that Schitt’s Creek has generated,” said Mort Marcus and Ira Bernstein, co-presidents of Debmar-Mercury. “We enter the off-network market as this renewed series is coming off of its highest-rated season in the U.S. and four consecutive seasons of audience growth.”
Commissioned by CBC, Schitt’s Creek is produced by Not A Real Company Productions and created by Eugene Levy and Daniel Levy. The executive producers are Eugene Levy, Daniel Levy, Andrew Barnsley, Fred Levy, David West Read and Ben Feigin. Schitt’s Creek is produced in association with CBC and Pop TV, and distributed internationally by ITV Studios Global Entertainment.
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Photos: Deadline Emmy’s Contenders Event + Photo Session

Dan, Annie, Eugene, and Catherine are in attendance at Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys event today. I’ve added some photos to the gallery. I will be adding more soon hopefully. Enjoy.

Photos/Video/Press: Tornoto Band Spoofs Carly Rae Jepsen Video With Tom Hanks

I Really Like You by Little Junior on VEVO.

Remember that music video that Carly Rae Jepsen put out in 2015 for her single I Really Like You, starring Tom Hanks in a leading lip-synching role?

Toronto band Little Junior certainly does, so much so that they painstakingly remade the video, frame-for-frame.

Sure, the budget was nowhere near that of Jepsen’s, and Schitt’s Creek’s Annie Murphy acts as a stand-in for Tom Hanks (in a rather disturbing mask, mind you), but somehow this video seems far more joyful than the original.

Filmed in one hectic twenty-hour day at The Brandscape studio on Dupont, director Max Parr helped the band piece the video together with more than a little help from their friends (keep your eyes peeled for cameos from fellow musicians such as members of July Talk and Hollerado).

Bonus: all the money made from the song and video will be donated to Youth Line, a youth-led organization providing peer support to the city’s LGBTQ2 community.

“We had to figure out how “shot-for-shot” we could really get it,” said Parr.

“We wouldn’t be able to find city streets in Toronto identical to the ones used in the original video, and we weren’t going to be able to get as many extras.”

“I knew we were going to have to lean in the opposite direction of reality and fully swede the video. This meant shooting everything inside and making all of the city streets and buildings out of foam and cardboard. I’ve worked on a number of ambitious art-heavy videos, but this one was next level.”

Sweding, a term coined by director Michel Gondry, means “to remake something from scratch using whatever you can get your hands on”.

This video does just that, as charming hand-painted set pieces and props take the place of the original New York City locations.

“The band spent many late nights with Marty (MacPherson) in a little garage, building and painting set pieces. Basically while one scene was shot, stuff was being built and painted for the next shot,” said Little Junior fronter Rane Elliott-Armstrong, who dressed in Carly drag for the video.

High fives are in order for Murphy, who sported the prosthetics, courtesy of The Butcher Shop FX, for 18 hours and truly embodied Hanks’ rather awkward performance.

“In the original video Tom Hanks doesn’t fully nail the lip-syncing of the song, so Annie broke down all of his lip movements PHONETICALLY, so she could sync up perfectly with Tom’s performance and not the track,” said Parr.

“After being caked up with Tom’s face, we realized that the articulation of her mouth was very limited and not entirely capable of the complex mouth choreography she had been practicing.”

“That said, I think it still worked out amazing and her limp mouth just adds to the eeriness of her Tom,” said Parr. “We were all convinced her face would no longer be there when the make-up came off.”

“She absolutely slayed her performance, there’s a side-by-side version floating around YouTube and it’s uncanny how similar they are!” said Elliot-Armstrong.

The video has many easter eggs moments, including Parr in the video as one of the Tinder matches, and the book on the bedside table in the opening shot being changed from “The Manly Art of Knitting” to “The Art of Sweding”. And yes, Jepsen’s seen the video.

“(She) saw the video and said she liked it. We screamed when we heard that,” said Elliott-Armstrong. “We are huge fans of Carly Rae, we play her music in our van constantly.”

There’s no knowing how many times Parr and the production team watched the Jepsen version to truly nail the remake, but all that work certainly paid off.

“I’m afraid that every video I make from now on will just unintentionally end up being a remake of CRJ’s “I Really Like You” because it’s the only thing I see now when I close my eyes,” said Parr.
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Photos: Schitt’s Creek 4×12 HD Screencaps + Stills

What a finale!! This week’s episode (which was season 4’s finale) was phenomenal. I can’t wait for season 5. I can’t wait, I can’t wait! I’ve added HD screencaps and missing stills. I will work on adding all the missing extras from season 4 soon as well as any missing Schitt’s Creek images to the gallery. Enjoy!

Photos/Press: Ask AnnieThing: “Should I Feel Badly for Still Being a Virgin?”

Q: I’m 22 years old and—yikes!—still a super virgin. I’ve tried dating through apps and have had no success because everyone seems to be looking for an “instant gratification” that I can’t give them. I feel so behind the curve. How do I date when everyone I meet expects to have sex right away? Should I feel badly for being a virgin when my peers are sexually active?
Well, hello and welcome.

Here is my short answer: No, no, NO. You should absolutely, positively not feel badly for being a virgin at ANY age.

Here is my long answer:

If this big, beautiful, overpopulated world can offer us one scrap of comfort, it’s this: the likelihood of you being the only person to experience, well, anything, is very, very unlikely. Therefore, I would put a large amount of money on the fact that when it comes to being a virgin later in the game, you are not alone!

Losing the oooool’ V-card (ugh, I’m sorry) means different things to different people. There are people who make mixtapes comprising mostly of Goo Goo Dolls and Enya, and wait and wait and wait for a rainy day when their parents aren’t home, then slap on some fairy lights and invite their longtime boyfriend over for “the big event.” (Why are you looking at me like that; that’s not MY story. OK it was me.) Then there are people, like one of my best friends, who just wanted to get it over with, so they had sex with one of their friends in a bathroom at IHOP. (Don’t worry, I’ve been assured that bathroom was one of the “bigger, cleaner ones.”)

If you’re one of those people who want to wait for a really special person to lose your virginity to in a really special way (which is great), do that. I know that in today’s world of Tinder/Grindr/Whatevr-style instant gratification, it can feel like all people are looking for is someone to have sex with RIGHT NOW BEFORE THEY JIZZ A HOLE IN THEIR PANTS. While this may be the case with some, there are also lots of people out there who are looking for something slower-paced and meaningful. Something that will ruin fewer pants. If you don’t mind waiting a little longer, I have a lot of faith that the right person will come along, and they’ll understand and appreciate where you’re at.

But if you’re one of those people that juuuuuust would rather. get. that. virginity out of the way (which is also great), do that. Maybe—like my friend—you have a person in your life that you’d feel comfortable having your first time with. Call ’em up! Tell them the sitch! If you’re both cool and comfy with said sitch, have a drink! Do the sex! Have a laugh! Or maybe you meet someone online that you vibe with. Go on a date! Tell them the sitch! If you’re both cool and comfy with said sitch, go on another date! Do the sex!

If none of this applies to you, and you’re totally happy being a virgin (which is also also great), stick with that. There are lots of fun, sexy things to do that don’t have to involve losing your virginity. Laser tag and handjobs, for example. Sally Jesse Raphael reruns and going down on each other. Sitting next to an untouched Scrabble board and touching each other’s boobs while listening to Shania Twain. The possibilities are endless!

Maybe NONE of this applies to you and you’re totally happy being a virgin who doesn’t engage in any sexual activity (which is ALSO GREAT), so do that. What’s important is that you’re being true to yourself and not being pressured to do anything you’re not comfortable with. Anyone making you feel otherwise can go for a long trot off a tiny diving board, as the saying goes.

Goo Goo Dolls and IHOP aside, the main point I’m trying to make is, don’t worry about being “normal.” Go at your own pace. Be honest about your virginity. Let things happen on your own terms. Losing your virginity doesn’t have to be “special” in the sense that you should spend 10 years crocheting a blanket upon which you shall be deflowered, but it certainly should be special in the sense that you are in control of, and comfortable with the situation when it happens. Go forth!!
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